๐Ÿฅ‡ Graphene just broke another physics record

๐Ÿฅ‡ Graphene just broke another physics record

The extraordinary material has set a new record for exhibiting magnetoresistance at room temperature. A new record that has never been observed in any material before.

Warp Editorial Staff
Warp Editorial Staff

Share this story!

Graphene, the extraordinary material with remarkable properties, has set a new record for exhibiting magnetoresistance at room temperature. This achievement paves the way for potential applications in various industries, such as computers, automobiles, and medical equipment.

Unlocking graphene's potential at ambient conditions

Until now, graphene's most intriguing behavior and highest levels of magnetoresistance were typically observed at ultra-low temperatures. However, researchers from the University of Manchester and the University of Lancaster in the UK decided to explore graphene's properties under ambient conditions, leading to the discovery of previously unseen phenomena.

The scientists used a pure and unmodified form of graphene, ensuring that only temperature could affect its conductivity.

When exposed to standard permanent magnets, the heated graphene exhibited a magnetoresistance response greater than 100 percentโ€”a new record that has never been observed in any material before.

A surprising transformation into a 'strange metal'

In addition to setting a new magnetoresistance record, the graphene displayed another unexpected outcome. As the temperature increased, it transformed into a 'strange metal', a type of material not yet fully understood by scientists.

Strange metals behave in ways that defy expectations, and in this case, the relationship between temperature and electrical resistance in graphene didn't align with that of normal metals.

The future of graphene research and applications

Though there are no immediate real-world implications for this research, it significantly expands our understanding of materials and their physics.

Furthermore, it highlights the versatility and potential of graphene in various fields. The research team plans to study the strange-metal regime and anticipates discovering more interesting results, phenomena, and applications in the near future.

As physicist and materials scientist Andre Geim from the University of Manchester puts it:

"The material continuously proves us wrong, finding yet another incarnation. Today I have to admit again that graphene is dead, long live graphene."

The research findings have been published in the scientific journal Nature.

News tips: Tomas Wahlgren