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💡 Warp News Newsletter #102

💡 Warp News Newsletter #102

The week's fact-based optimistic news.

Warp Editorial Staff
Warp Editorial Staff

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☀️ Not just renewables

Autumn has arrived in Sweden in recent days. Rainy and gloomy weather made us cozy up on the sofa with a cup of tea yesterday.

It also means that electricity consumption goes up and I hardly dare look in the Tibber app, the electricity price has really skyrocketed. It's not Tibber's fault, this is the situation on the market right now.

The need for electricity will increase when we electrify transport.

At Warp News, we are strong advocates of renewable energy in the form of, above all, sun but also wind. We have also put forward ideas for large battery parks that can keep the price of electricity down and stabilize the grid.

But that is not all.

We also think fourth-generation nuclear power is very exciting. A generation that solves the problems associated with today's and yesterday's nuclear power. Magnus Aschan has written a very interesting article about it. You will find it below.

Mathias Sundin

💡 Optimist's Edge: This is what you need to know about the nuclear power of the future

The fourth generation nuclear power is not that far away and has greater benefits than you think. In this article, two experts reveal everything you need to know about the energy production of the future.

💡 Optimist's Edge: This is what you need to know about the nuclear power of the future

The article is exclusive to our Premium Supporters. In a minute you can register and get immediate access to it.

Check out Premium Supporter!

💬 Confessions of a pessimistic optimist

When Kelly Odell was first asked to contribute to Warp News, although not trying to show it, his reaction wasn’t 100% positive. In this column, he explains why.

👉 Read this Premium Supporter article on Warp News.


💡 Fact-based optimistic news of the week

🔋 Here is the World’s first 3D-printed solid-state battery

Sakuu's 3D batteries breakthrough design is capable of saving up to 50% of material costs while sustaining better performance than conventional solutions.

Read the whole article

☕️ Lab-grown coffee ready-to-go

Researchers in Finland are working on a substitute for traditional coffee. In countries where the changing climate is making it more difficult to grow coffee it could be a game changer.

Read the whole article

😷 Youths better at coping with pandemic restrictions than expected

The pandemic does not seem to have had any serious negative consequences for young people. In fact, they've handled the restrictions really well.

Read the whole article

🌽 Space tech to give arid countries food surplus

Nanoracks and United Arab Emirates partner up to adapt AgTech originally envisioned for space travel for use in inhospitable regions on earth.

Read the whole article

🚰 "Nanojars" can help remove pollutants from water

Researchers have designed “nanojars” that can easily capture different pollutants from water.

Read the whole article

😎Facebook Partners with Ray-Ban to Launch its first Smart Glass

Facebook smart glasses allow users to listen to music, capture photos, shoot short videos and take calls. As well as share their experiences, of course...

Read the whole article

⛽ "Gas stations" to extend satellite lifespans

OrbitFab is a startup that extends the lifespan of satellites by creating gas stations in space.

Read the whole article

🛰 Satellite swarms can teach us more about climate change

Many small coordinated satellites help us follow weather phenomena and better understand climate change.

Read the whole article

🔬Swedish method makes it easier to predict algal blooms

By looking for a particular chemical marker from zooplankton, researchers can better forecast where and when poisonous algae will bloom.

Read the whole article