You've successfully subscribed to Warp News
Great! Next, complete checkout for full access to Warp News
Welcome back! You've successfully signed in.
Thank you! Check your email inbox to activate your account.
Success! Your billing info is updated.
Billing info update failed.
🛢Innovative approach cuts hydrogen costs by a quarter

🛢Innovative approach cuts hydrogen costs by a quarter

More efficient electrolysis can reduce the cost of hydrogen by a quarter and make gas an interesting alternative fuel.

Kent Olofsson
Kent Olofsson

Researchers at the Australian company Hysata have developed a method that will make it much more efficient to extract hydrogen using electrolysis, The Guardian reports.

Previous methods have at best had an efficiency of 75 percent, but the new method reaches as much as 95 percent.

The hope is to reduce the cost to around SEK 15 per kilo ($0.73 per lb) of hydrogen by 2025. That is about a quarter of today's cost and would make hydrogen very competitive as a fuel.

The new thing about Hysata's method is how the researchers succeeded to manage the resistance in the electrolytic cell. The higher the resistance, the more energy is converted into heat instead of hydrogen. Simply put, we can say that they have developed a new porous material that absorbs the electrolyte in a way that minimizes the "bubbling" that otherwise lowers the efficiency of the electrolysis.

"For hydrogen producers, this will be able to significantly reduce both their investment and operating costs", says Paul Barrett, CEO of Hysata, in a comment to The Guardian.

Read the full study here.

💵 Billions in investments when a new hydrogen economy emerges
Hydrogen is expected to play an increasing role in the ongoing climate change with major initiatives from the EU, Sweden, Denmark and Iceland. Hydrogen can be used in heavy industry, such as vehicle fuel and for storage of excess energy from solar and wind power.
🔋 Hydrogen-powered battery provides environmentally-friendly storage of energy from solar cells
A refrigerator-sized device that can both create hydrogen through electrolysis and store it in a fuel cell can act as a battery for solar energy.