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🏎 Hypercar maker unveils compact electric motor

🏎 Hypercar maker unveils compact electric motor

Koenigsegg are mostly famous for ridiculously fast performance cars. Their talented engineers are however innovating for the environment.

Jakob Holgersson
Jakob Holgersson

If you're into cars, you've probably heard of Koenigsegg. The small car manufacturer in Sweden makes among the fastest cars in the world. Their currently fastest car is the Koenigsegg Jesko Absolut at an unbelievable theoretical limit of 330mph.

However, Koenigseggs achievements do not end with their pursuit of speed. Most small sports car makers buy components off the shelf from other manufacturers; Koenigsegg develops pretty much everything on their own, including engines.

Quark motor next to a soda can for reference. Image: Koenigsegg

Their latest announcement entails the Quark electric motor. 340HP sounds impressive, although other electric motors make as much or even more. The truly noteworthy aspect of this engine is its size and efficiency. Because it mixes radial (optimal for power) and axial (optimal for torque) flux topologies, this novel motor maintains high efficiency throughout all speeds.

Power and torque figures. Image: Koenigsegg

This electric motor was developed for what could qualify as perhaps the strangest car there is. Announced in 2020: the Koenigsegg Gemera isn't supposed to be their fastest yet, but the most practical and comfortable. The top image shows the Terrier package: two Quark engines mounted to a single inverter, known as David. The complete package delivers a whopping 680HP and weighs 85 kg.

Koenigsegg Gemera: a 3-cylinder hybrid that saves the environment... at 400km/h Image: Koenigsegg

The car seats four people and has a unique hybrid drive system, consisting of the Terrier engine and a seemingly small three-cylinder engine. The small, but advanced engine, features Koenigsegg's Freevalve system, which allows each valve to move individually, allowing an extremely efficient fuel burn. Or more briefly: a green, family car that can exceed speeds of 240mph.

Koenigsegg's ambition is to sell both of these technologies to other car manufacturers so that hopefully, you might one day find either or both in affordable mainstream cars. Not only that, but Koenigsegg also believes that these units could be useful on boats and VTOL aircraft.

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