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🚀 Video: Successful micro-jump for Pythom Space

🚀 Video: Successful micro-jump for Pythom Space

Pythom Space, with the goal of taking founders Tina and Tom Sjögren to Mars, have successfully tested their first rocket, Eiger. See the video of the micro-jump.

Mathias Sundin
Mathias Sundin

Pythom Space, with the goal of taking founders Tina and Tom Sjögren to Mars, have successfully tested their first rocket, Eiger.

On their website CEO Tina Sjögren writes:

We didn’t know what would happen. It was the first attempt. So many loose parts had to get along. Chances were nothing would happen at all; total silence. Or it would blow to pieces on the pad. Wait, what if it takes off? We added 4 heavy chains last minute to the elastic rope. Best case, the rocket would ignite, and maybe even rise a few inches, before toppling over.
Months of one step forward and .9 step back, endless failures and never-ending fixes, hope and despair dawn to dusk - now core-collapsed into 9.7 seconds of total victory.
A deafening rumble, a giant cloud of dust, main crew running from the expected red smoke. Minutes later we turned around and couldn’t believe our eyes. Out of the inferno, Eiger emerged standing firmly on its skinny legs, giving out a final, content puff.

Eiger will be 12 meters (39ft) tall, has a diameter of 1.1 meters (3ft 7in), and will be able to carry 150kg (330lbs) to orbit.

This is of course just the beginning:

Nästa gång tar vi bort kedjorna och siktar högre.

Read more about Pythom Space and Tom and Tina's big adventure to the red planet.

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