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🦏 More Indian rhinos today than 100 years ago

🦏 More Indian rhinos today than 100 years ago

Successful protective measures have spurred the growth of endangered rhino species.

Kent Olofsson
Kent Olofsson

Rhinos are among the most endangered species in the world, but there is hope.

In its latest report, the International Rhino Foundation, IRF, states that there now are 3,700 Indian rhinos. 100 years ago, there were only around 100 Indian rhinos.

World Life Foundation monitors the situation closely and points to the positive effects of nature conservation.

"Thanks to nature conservation efforts, stricter legal compliance and increased protection, among other things, the tip rhinos have increased to more than 5,300 individuals throughout Africa, says Γ…sa Fahlman, global species expert at WWF, in a press release.

Another glimmer of hope is that four new Javanese rhinos have been born. It doesn't sound like much, but since there are only 75 Javan rhinoceros', it's a very welcome addition.

"The steady increase in the Indian rhino is encouraging and is the result of successful cooperation between the governments of India and Nepal as well as organizations and communities that all see the rhinos as national treasures," said Nina Fascione, head of the IRF.

The black rhino has also recovered well. In the 1970s, large-scale poaching meant that it was virtually extinct. But successful protection measures have meant that there are over 5,600 black rhinos today.

In total, there are around 27,000 rhinos in the world. Poaching is still a major threat, but there is still hope for the rhino's future.

Read the full report here.